Get Instant ABO Improvement Credit for Academy Activities Using Your Diplomate ID

Updated: Aug 12, 2021


Academy activities that count for ABO Continuing Certification credit can now be transferred directly to the ABO from your Academy CME Central page. To do so, simply log in to CME Central, enter your ABO ID in the box located in the upper right corner of the page, and click save. (You can find your ABO ID at the top of your ABO Status Page.) Then, click the “Transfer CME Credits to the ABO” button. Please note, you must transfer your CME to the ABO after each AAO course is completed in order to receive ABO Continuing Certification credit.


The Improvement in Medical Practice section of your ABO Status Page will update to reflect completion of the activity and you will receive a confirmation email from the ABO for your records.


If you do not save your ABO ID on CME Central prior to completing the course, please email the ABO at moc@abop.org with proof of course completion and allow up to 5 business days for the credit to be reflected on your ABO Status Page.


The AAO offers 11 online CME activity options which have been approved for Improvement in Medical Practice credit by the ABO. Completing any one of these AAO activities will satisfy the ABO requirement for an improvement activity and provide you with the ability to claim CME. If you are an AAO member, access to these activities is included in the price of your membership. Current activity options include: Building Best Practices for Informed Consent; Choosing Wisely: Leading Patients to Recommended Care; Anisometropic Amblyopia; Anti-VEGF Therapy in Patients with Neovascular AMD; Assessing Risk of Glaucoma Progression; Improving Outcomes in Cataract Surgery: Targeting Best Corrected Visual Acuity; Improving Outcomes in Cataract Surgery: Targeting Uncorrected Visual Acuity; Improving Vision after Retinal Detachment Repair; Laser and Injection Therapy in Patients with DME; Treatment of Uveitic Macular Edema; and When to Change Glaucoma Therapy and Why Patients Might Fail.